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How to use AutoHotkey to Automate IE from within Edge | Windows 10 & Windows 11

Automate IE from within EdgeA while back someone wrote me saying how IE is dead and wondering how we can automate other browsers.  While IE is definitely on it’s death-bed, I do still automate IE for sites that will let IE load.  Someone mentioned that Windows 11 completely removes Internet Explorer thus, if you’re running Windows 11, automating IE is not an option.    I looked into this and had some very interesting discoveries:

  1. The IWB2 Learner tool works within Edge when in “IE Mode”
  2. In Windows 11, you can add IE back and still use it in IE mode.  (I’ll document how I did this in a later video)

When I realized the above, I played with Edge (in IE Mode) in Windows 10 & Windows 11 and was able to connect to the DOM!  Granted my approach sucked but I asked Tank (Charlie Simmons) to take a look at it and he borrowed on the concept and re-wrote what i did into something that is decentily reliable.  You can get the download here

Here’s a video showing how I use AutoHotkey to Automate IE from within Edge!

xmlHTTPRequest vs. WinHTTPRequest- What killer advantages does the xmlRequest have?

xmlHTTPRequest vs. WinHTTPRequestIn this video I walk through both the xmlHTTPRequest and the WinHTTPRequest and I compare the xmlHTTPRequest vs. WinHTTPRequest.  As I mention in the video, Jackie Sztuk and I have a great  AutoHotkey webinar on Intro to API calls.  I also have several examples on my API page.

I also mention using Fiddler to monitor the browser traffic and grab your cookies / headers.

xmlHTTPRequest vs. WinHTTPRequest tutorial


Here’s the syntax I used for the WinHTTPRequest example

WinHTTPRequest syntax

And here’s the corresponding two XML API calls I demonstrated in the video

xmlHTTPRequest example using Msxml2.XMLHTTP COM object

Here’s the example connecting to the IE page and sending the API request with the xmlHTTPRequest()

08: Automating Chrome with AutoHotkey: How to handle EventListeners & custom edit fields

Automating Chrome with AutoHotkeyAutomating Chrome with AutoHotkey: handle EventListeners & custom edit fields


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Automating Chrome with AutoHotkey Script to Handle EventListeners & custom edit fields

Notes on handle EventListeners & custom edit fields

00:09     When web scraping, often there will be buttons I can’t press, text that doesn’t get “acknowledged” that it has been entered, etc.
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07: How to Create and connect to new Chrome profiles with AutoHotkey

Automating Chrome with AutoHotkeyIn this short video GeekDude walks us through why we need to consider Chrome profiles and how to create / use them.

Create and connect to new Chrome profiles with AutoHotkey

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Notes from Create and connect to new Chrome profiles with AutoHotkey

00:09     There’s been a lot of confusion on Chrome profiles.  What they are, why you should concern yourself with them when using AutoHotkey.

00:23     Your Chrome profile is what keeps you logged into websites, connected to Google, etc.  Most of the time you won’t need access to your entire Chrome profile.  But you might want to start with a blank slate if you’re distributing your code to people.  Or you want to create a new instance of Chrome that you don’t want attached to an existing Chrome tab.  For any of those, you need to have a Chrome profile

01:17     This is because most people don’t have the remote debugging flag on their default shortcut.  If you launch chrome with debugging code, it will automatically group it with the current process window.

02:38     So instead of spawning a new Chrome window that is listening to the debug window, it will open a new page on the existing Chrome instance without the debugging access (even though you specified debugging)

02:52     So in order to get Chrome to open a new instance, you need to use the Chrome profile.

03:51     Create a folder  (name it what you want) and tell Chrome to use it the profile flag.  “–user data-dir” with your directory  i.e. “–user data-dir-C:\temp\newProfile”

05:18     Looking in the profile folder, you can see Chrome has generated a bunch of files.  Things like Cookies, browser history, etc.  Everything Chrome remembers…

05:47     If you’re targeting portable Chrome, making sure you have this profile set correctly can be a big deal!  If you use AutoHotkey to launch portable Chrome, it might still load the default profile.  Make sure you specify the Chrome profile!

07:32     Everywhere you would have used Chrome. In your script, use ChromeInst.  (i.e. Instead of Chrome.GetPage use ChromeInst.GetPage.

07:32     That tells Chrome to look for this new / specific instance of Chrome instead of the default version.  Remember, it’s only “new” right after you make it.

08:55     Chrome builds the sub folders / content

Thanks again GeekDude!!!